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September 18, 2019by ashleys0

Adapted from Alexandra Louis

During the preschool and kindergarten years, cognitive development is accelerated through play. Play encourages all the important areas of development. It includes social, emotional, physical, communication/language and cognitive development. This refers to learning to question, problem-solve, learn about spatial relationships. In addition, they acquire knowledge 

through imitation, memory, number sense, classification, and symbolic play

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Cognitive Development Skills Learned During Preschool        

  • Questioning

When a child asks ‘why?’ in order to determine causes. A child asks questions to solve problems and clarify their understanding.

  • Spatial Relationships

Exploring the spatial and physical aspects of their environment. For example, a child places a toy into a container, dumps it out and then fills up the container again with the toy.

  • Problem Solving

 

When children experiment, investigate, and work together with other children to problem solve. For example, when children ask questions to understand what will happen next.

  • Imitation

When children imitate the behaviors of those around them (e.g. other children, educators and parents). For example, when a child sticks out their tongue,  imitating another child who has done the same.

  • Memory

Beginning to differentiate between objects and people, and learn their daily routines. For example, when a child puts away their toy bin back in the same place it was on the shelf before.

  • Number Sense

A child’s understanding of number concepts (e.g. more and less) and number relationships. They begin to understand quantities, recognize relationships and understand the order of numbers. For example, singing along to ‘Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed’.

  • Classification

A child’s ability to categorize, sort, group, and connect objects. For example, sorting different colored pom-poms into the same colored boxes.

  • Symbolic Play

preschool friendships, pretend play

During play, children use objects, ideas, and actions to stand for other things. For example, holding a toy phone up to their ear or rocking a baby back and forth.

To read the original article please click here


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August 28, 2019by ashleys0

The First Days of Preschool

Adapted from whattoexpect.com

TIPS TO MAKE THE FIRST DAYS OF PRESCHOOL AND THE DAYS AND WEEKS AHEAD A GREAT EXPERIENCE FOR YOUR LITTLE ONE AND FOR YOU

TIP 1: DON’T RUSH THROUGH THE MORNING.

Get everyone up at a reasonable hour so that you won’t have to hurry your child through breakfast or risk being late. After all, no one likes to race through the school morning routine – especially on the first days.

TIP 2: ARRIVE FASHIONABLY EARLY.

This way, your little one can slowly settle in before the real action starts. He’ll also get more face time with the teacher – which will be tougher to do once all the other kids are there.

TIP 3: BRING A COMFORT OBJECT.

first days of preschool

If the preschool allows it, let your child bring along her favorite stuffed animal (or blanket, or whatever object does the trick) so the new setting doesn’t feel so scary. Before long, your child will feel comfortable, allowing her teacher to put the comfort object to the side.

TIP 4: PUT ON A HAPPY FACE.

Anxiety may be eating you up inside, but don’t let your child see it because nerves are highly contagious. When your child sees that you’re upbeat and you look confident – the transition from home to preschool will be smooth and he will feel upbeat and excited too.

TIP 5: HANG AROUND, BUT DON’T HOVER.

Many preschools let (or even encourage) parents to stay in the classroom for all or part of the first few days. If this is allowed, try to stay a bit – keeping a distance away from your child allowing her to explore her new surroundings. Your goal is to let the teacher take over so you can get on with your day.

TIP 6: KEEP GOOD-BYES SHORT AND SWEET.

When it’s time for you to make an exit, hold back your tears a little longer (smile!) give your new preschooler a hug, and let him know when you’ll be back (“I’ll pick you up after lunch” or whenever you plan on picking her up). Then leave and don’t linger because he can’t get on with his day until you do. Finally, no matter how tempting, never sneak out when your preschooler is looking the other way as it will make him feel insecure and less trusting.

Just remember, it’s common for kids to have a difficult time separating, however, chances are she’ll be fine five minutes after you walk out the door. If it’s taking a while for your little one to adjust, don’t panic – our preschool teachers and their assistants have seen it all and they know just what to do, so ask his teacher for help. You’ll be pleasantly surprised at pickup seeing your child very happy and busy!

To read the original article click here

To watch a video click here


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